myHack Installer 1.0 RC3 Released

This version is now deprecated, consult the installer guide for a link to the latest version.

This release contains important bugfixes and some very helpful new features.

Read full documentation here.

Changelog:

v1.0 RC3:

  • Bugfix: PC EFI 10.3 was not properly installing over the Chameleon boot file in previous versions.
  • Bugfix: OSInstall MBR MOD would sometimes not properly install when using RC2.
  • – OSInstall MBR MOD now checks for OSInstall.mpkg on target drive and is installed automatically.
  • – Graphics Enabler option added.
  • – Consolidated and simplified core options.

v1.0 RC2:

  • Bugfix: Added permissions enabling script to post-install. Details posted on the v1.0 RC2 release page.
  • – Integrated OSInstall.mpkg & OSInstall framework into a single option.
  • – Changed openhaltrestart.kext option to selected by default.
  • – Added pfix v1.1 to installer.
  • – Improved kext descriptions.

v1.0 RC1:

Includes:

  • Chameleon 2.0 RC3.
  • PC EFI 10.3.
  • – Sample com.apple.Boot.plist for basic operation.
  • – Snow Leopard inspired myHack Chameleon boot theme.
  • – All of the kexts listed on the Downloads page.
  • – A number of bugfixes and snow leopard specific enhancements to the Chameleon installation scripts.
  • – Detailed descriptions of each custom option.

myHack Installer 1.0 RC2 Released

This version is now deprecated, consult the installer guide for a link to the latest version.

This release contains a minor bugfix and some additional features.

Read full documentation here.

Changelog:

v1.0 RC2:

  • Bugfix: Added permissions enabling script to post-install. More about the bug below.
  • – Integrated OSInstall.mpkg & OSInstall framework into a single option.
  • – Changed openhaltrestart.kext option to selected by default.
  • – Added pfix v1.1 to installer.
  • – Improved kext descriptions.

v1.0 RC1:

Includes:

  • Chameleon 2.0 RC3.
  • PC EFI 10.3.
  • – Sample com.apple.Boot.plist for basic operation.
  • – Snow Leopard inspired myHack Chameleon boot theme.
  • – All of the kexts listed on the Downloads page.
  • – A number of bugfixes and snow leopard specific enhancements to the Chameleon installation scripts.
  • – Detailed descriptions of each custom option.

I strongly suggest anyone who has a copy of RC1 to replace it with this immediately!

More about the bugfix:

It was brought to my attention by aschar on #snowleopard that he had noticed a bug in the installer. One that had been documented before but that I personally had not experianced.

<aschar> Before fixing permissions and/or rebuilding kextcaches or installing SL – check each time that on your Snow Volume “ignore permissions” is unchecked (nothing in checkbox) – with Get Info in Finder

Well we worked together to find an integrated solution for the installer. He found this page over on apples support site regarding the “vsdbutil” command line utility.

This fix has now been integrated into the post-install script and you no longer have to use the checkbox if you are using the myHack Installer!

myHack Installer 1.0 RC1 Released

This version is now deprecated, consult the installer guide for a link to the latest version.

This has been brewing for a short time now. After updating, debugging and extensive testing it is ready for public release.

Includes:

  • Chameleon 2.0 RC3.
  • PC EFI 10.3.
  • – Sample com.apple.Boot.plist for basic operation.
  • – Snow Leopard inspired myHack Chameleon boot theme.
  • – All of the kexts listed on the Downloads page.
  • – A number of bugfixes and snow leopard specific enhancements to the Chameleon installation scripts.
  • – Detailed descriptions of each custom option.

Read full documentation here.

Permissions & KEXT Caches

The information on this page applies only to Snow Leopard, for Lion the permissions are the same but prelinked kernel caches are used instead of Extensions.mkext files.

Additionally the “pfix” utility is now deprecated, I have replaced it with the myfix utility instead, Please consult the downloads page for a link to the latest version of myfix.

I have written the following utility which simplifies and automates the process of repairing permissions and rebuilding kext caches. It will test for and prevent a number of common errors that may arise if the manual method (Which I have discussed further below) is used incorrectly. I personally suggest that you use this utility (instead of doing this manually) to reduce or eliminate the potential for user error & to save time.

Further documentation and how to do this manually:

One of the most common problems with Snow Leopard on PC’s is incorrect permissions and improperly built kext caches. While it may not always be necessary it is a good idea to correct permissions and rebuild kext caches anytime you modify your extensions or install software which adds new kexts to your system.

To do this manually open a terminal and enter the following commands to repair the permissions on your “/Extra” directory:

$ sudo chown -R 0:0 /Extra

$ sudo chmod -R 755 /Extra

You may also need to repair the permissions on your “/System/Library/Extensions” directory:

$ sudo chown -R 0:0 /System/Library/Extensions

$ sudo chmod -R 755 /System/Library/Extensions

Now build the Extensions.mkext for /Extra/Extensions in /Extra with the following command.

$ sudo kextcache -v 1 -a i386 -a x86_64 -m /Extra/Extensions.mkext /Extra/Extensions

You may also need to rebuild the Extensions.mkext for the “/System/Library/Extensions” directory:

$ sudo kextcache -v 1 -a i386 -a x86_64 -m /System/Library/Caches/com.apple.kext.caches/Startup/Extensions.mkext /System/Library/Extensions

Then you may reboot your system. Please note that the above examples are assuming you want to repair permissions on your root volume ( / ) if you are repairing the permissions on another volume in your system make sure to adjust the path accordingly.

IMPORTANT NOTE: If running these commands from Tiger it is necessary to delete all kext caches instead of rebuilding them. The kextcache utility on Tiger is unable to build Snow Leopard compatible kext caches and as a result any Snow Leopard system which has these incompatible kext caches will fail to boot. The pfix utility (v2.0) detects the OS X version and will apply these changes automatically.

 

NOTE: I was originally using the find command to set directories to 755 and files to 644 instead of just chmod -R 755. While that method actually sets the correct permissions for your extensions according to the “OS X Standards” there were some failures reported due to a few kexts containing non-standard binaries that required executable privileges. You will find that the majority of vanilla kexts inside /S/L/E have their directories set to 755 and the files inside of them are 644. Thus this is the ‘proper’ method to use when correcting permissions for most of them. The few that have executable binaries inside of them however, make it impractical to achieve perfection. While this is not absolutely required for them to ‘work’ it is a good practice to learn how to handle unix permissions properly and to not have files set to executable (755) unless absolutely required for their operation.

With that said I am now advising everyone to use the chmod -R 755 method I have posted above and to use diskutil to repair the permissions on your snow leopard installation once you get it up and running. More information can be found on the pfix2.0 release page linked above and in the comments on this page.

 

 

Why “OSx86 Distros” are bad.

I see people on IRC asking “Where can I get an 0Sx86 10.6 distro?” on a fairly regular basis so I would like to take a moment to explain exactly why myself and others discourage their use.

#1 – Distros cause problems!

If you haven’t noticed most, if not all, distros apply more hacks than are required on the average system in an attempt to function on as many systems as possible. While this may seem like an OK thing to you while things are “working” you may not even notice diminished performance or realize that those bugs you are having are due to a particular hacked kernel extension somewhere that isn’t even required for your own hardware… Additionally if it has over-written “vanilla” kernel extensions on your system a software update could corrupt your install and leave you with an OS that will not boot. If this happens chances are since you used a distro, and didn’t learn for yourself what needed to be patched on your system and how to patch it – you probably won’t know how to fix it.

#2 – The OSx86 Community does not want to support distros!

If you can’t get support from the actual distro developer (most do not support their releases) you will be met with ridicule by others in the community. Why? Because the distro likely broke your install to begin with and because people who use distros generally are unable to articulate what patched kexts they are using or understand basic terminology like kext, permissions, mkext, or how to use basic terminal commands. We have a fairly good understanding of common errors with RETAIL installs but if we had to stop to try and fix every backwater distro out there – that has an error simply because it’s patching kexts incorrectly for a users system, well… We wouldn’t have time to work on anything else. We generally expect people who request support to have a decent level of self-competency so that it does not waste our time.

#3 – Distros encourage laziness!

Instead of learning how and why something works on your own system and improving your own understanding of OS X & PC hardware you want other people to do the work for you. With no profit or reward in it for them. If this sounds like you please do yourself a favor – go buy a mac!

#4 – Distros are Piracy!

This is an obvious one, if you own a retail OS X DVD you wouldn’t need to download a distro anyway, unless you are exceptionally lazy which brings us back to #3. Please support apple! If you want to run OS X on your non-apple hardware the least you should do is purchase a legitimate copy!

#5 – Conclusion

If you want to run OS X on your own PC hardware, do it the right way and learn how to achieve a working retail install from scratch. Please don’t take “shortcuts” with these “distros” – in the long run they will actually cause you much more trouble than learning how to do it for yourself. It may sound like a daunting ordeal at first glance but with utilities like myHack available it has never been easier to run OS X on your own hardware.